Sport

Kliff Kingsbury: Remote drafting could actually help teams

Cardinals coach Kliff Kingsbury’s just 40 years old, so he might be more comfortable than many of his brethren with the remote technology required to do football business during the coronavirus outbreak.

He’d still prefer to be able to work with players because that’s what coaches do, but he knows that his burden is relative, and can actually see some silver linings to it.

Kingsbury showed a bit of perspective during his Zoom teleconference with reporters.

“We’re able to watch film,” he said, via Katherine Fitzgerald of the Arizona Republic. “I think there are challenges, but it’s nothing compared to what the rest of the world is facing and doctors and nurses and people working at stores — I mean, this is gonna keep things in perspective. It’s football.

“So there’ll be adjustments to be made, but we’ll be able to call and text, and for the most part, we’re in our houses watching film and doing the same draft prep we do in our office, just without the human interaction.”

The Cardinals pick eighth overall, which allows them to narrow the field considerably as they evaluate prospects. And with over a month’s worth of pro days and all the in-person visits eliminated because of health and safety restrictions, teams will have to rely on information already collected, and the tape generated by players on the field.

“I’m sure we’ll still overthink it,” Kingsbury said. “I mean, we always tend to do that, but it may streamline it a little bit where it’s more of an efficient process. You go with what you see on tape. Luckily, we were able to have the combine and get to be around some of those top guys, but it could very well kind of eliminate some of that clutter.”

Teams will still make mistakes, since evaluating players and projecting them into future situations will always be inexact. But reducing factors could be a benefit for some, as they navigate the new process.